Writing Rubrics

General objective: Detailed Analysis + Genre + Personal Storytelling

This is the first writing assignment of the course. The goal of this writing assignment is to:
1) Demonstrate your skills in conducting a detailed reading and analysis of a text
2) Connect the text to a personal experience, feeling, or memory,
3) Form a broader narrative about the effects this type/genre of text (in this case, a song) can have on a person’s individual identity development.

Word Count and Title:

– 500-600 words
– Embedded audio or video of the song + link to song lyrics
– An original title that reflects the content of the blog post and the writer’s perspective/style

In-text links:

At least three (3) relevant in-text hyperlinks that direct the reader to a news, art, popular media, or academic source which helps illustrate the writer’s interpretation of the song.

Reference list:

A reference for the song. All other book/periodical or web information sources used in providing background information and interpretation of the song – including the in-text hyperlinks. Reference list should appear at the bottom of the blog post and be in MLA style.

Key writing components:

1) Describe the song, – its music, lyrics, the artist/performer who sang it, its popularity or lack of popularity.
2) Translate (if the song is not in English) and provide an interpretation of its lyrics. What do you think they mean? Why is this meaning significant?
3) When did you first hear the song? Do you remember where you were? Who you were with?
4) Why did this song have an effect on you? Was it the song itself that was unique, or did it represent something larger than just music and lyrics?
5) Why do you think music can have an effect like this on people?

Grading criteria:
Structure
– Did the writer complete the writing assignment fully, following directions on length, links, and citation of all references?
– Did the writer edit/revise the grammar, style, and content of the narrative in order to produce a refined final product?

Content
– Did the writer describe and interpret the song sufficiently, providing a detailed analysis of the lyrics and using direct or paraphrased quotes from the lyrics as evidence to support the writer’s arguments?
– Did the writer communicate the importance of the song on a personal level?
– Did the writer reflect on the effect of music on individual identity development and/or culture?

General Objective of Blog Post Comments: The blog post comment is a short response to the content and writing style/structure of another student’s blog post. All the commenting assignments will be done in groups with individuals who have already peer-reviewed each other’s writing or collaborated on a writing project together. The goal of comments in online writing is to create dialogue about the writer’s work and ideas.

In Comments Assignment #1, students will comment on Blog Post #1 of the classmates with whom they did the peer-review and process post activity/discussion. Because commenters will already have read earlier drafts of the writer’s work on Blog Post #1, their comments should be based in part on this previous knowledge.

Word Count:
40-60 words

Key Components and Grading Criteria:

1) All commenters should identify themselves by their first and last names in the comment in order to receive credit for having commented.

2) Comments should be written in a way that directly addresses the writer.

3) Comments should focus on one or two key points that the commenter thinks stand out within the blog post.

4) Comments should be substantive and specific. They should not be general or vague. Commenters should use direct quotes or paraphrasing from the blog post if needed. They can speak to the content of the blog post or the writer’s style of writing. They can provide praise, constructive criticism, or ask questions.

General objective: Reflecting on working with different text genres

In Blog Post #2, you will write a comparative essay on the work of Fahamu Pecou (1 image) and Jenny Zhang (“I Pulled a Leaf From My Eye”). Please read the Writing Rubric for Blog Post #2 to get a sense of what that assignment will entail.

In this Process Post, you will discuss your thinking and writing process by addressing the below list of questions about your experience reading, analyzing, and thinking about these texts; and, how you will write about two texts that come from two different genres (a work of visual art; a poem).

Word Count:
250-300 words

Questions to answer through your narrative:
1) Which of the two genres were you more familiar with before doing this assignment – poetry or visual art? If you were not familiar with either genre, which genres of literature do you most often read/listen to/watch either at school or outside of it. Remember you can choose tradition genres like novels, short stories, political books, biographies, and films; or, you can choose a more contemporary genre, like blogs, television shows, SNS feeds.

2) Which do you think is or will be more difficult to analyze – Fahamu Pecou’s paintings or Jenny Zhang’s poem? What makes it more complex? How will you work with a text that is challenging to analyze and write about?

3) When you write your comparative essay on the works of these two artists, do you think you will end up focusing more on the aspects of the pieces that make them different from each other or those that they share in common? Why?

4) What additional information do you think you might need to support your analysis in the essay? How will you look for outside sources to help you analyze these works – such as reviews of Pecou and Zhang’s work, or interviews with the artists? Will you use the “Other Girls” article as a source?

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer address all the questions asked in the prompt?

Content
– Did the writer describe their thoughts on the questions asked using enough details to make their points clearly and substantively?
– Did the writer provide specific examples as evidence to support their ideas about the work theyhave already done and/or will do in reading, analyzing, and writing about their chosen Fahamu Pecou image and the Jenny Zhang poem “I Pulled a Leaf Out of My Eye”?

General objective: Detailed Analysis + Genre + Comparative Analysis

In this course, the first two weeks of class were spent learning and demonstrating how to interpret and write about both images and texts that deal with individual identity formation. The goal of this writing assignment is to demonstrate the ability to write a comparative literary analysis of two different text genres: a work of visual art and a work of written poetry.

Students will use their own interpretations of each piece to show the similarities and differences in how each artist has used the work to discuss racial/ethnic/cultural and gender identity formation. They will also reflect on how the genre in which the text was created (visual art versus written poetry) affects one’s engagement with the themes of the text. 

Word Count and Title:

– 700-800 words
– An original title that reflects the content of the blog post and the writer’s perspective/style

In-text links:

In-text hyperlink directing the reader to the chosen Fahamu Pecou image. At least five (5) additional relevant in-text hyperlinks that direct the reader to a news, art, popular media, or academic source which helps illustrate the writer’s description of the Fahamu Pecou visual art image and Jenny Zhang’s “Leaf” poem or further support the writer’s interpretation of the two works.

Reference list:

All other book/periodical or web information sources used in the writing piece, including the chosen Pecou painting and Zhang’s poem, and all in-text hyperlinks, in MLA style.

Key writing components:

1) Describe and provide your own interpretation the chosen Fahamu Pecou image in detail.
2) Describe and provide your own interpretation of the Jenny Zhang poem “I Pulled a Leaf From My Eye” in detail.
3) In what ways are the works similar in their themes and approaches to the subject matter?
4) In what ways are the works different in their themes and approaches to the subject matter?
5) Which do you prefer: visual texts or written texts? Explain why.

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer complete the writing assignment fully, following directions on length, links, and references?
– Did the writer edit/revise the grammar, style, and content of the essay in order to produce a refined final product?

Content
– Did the writer describe and interpret both the visual and the written works sufficiently, providing a detailed analysis of each using direct and paraphrased quotes from the texts as evidence?
– Did the writer communicate key similarities and differences between the two works with regard to the main themes of racial/ethnic/cultural and gender identity formation?
– Did the writer reflect on whether visual or written works are preferable and why?

General objective: Reflecting on visual storytelling

In Blog Post #3, you will create your own version of Sherman Alexie’s “Half White/Half Indian” illustration and descriptions. Please read the Writing Rubric for Blog Post #3 to get a sense of what that assignment will entail.

In this Process Post, you will discuss your thinking and writing process by addressing the below list of questions about your experience reading, analyzing, and thinking about The Absolutely Diary of a Part-Time Indian; and, how you will create an original visual component in your blog post inspired by Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

Word Count:
250-300 words

Questions to answer through your narrative:

1) Will you draw the image of yourself or use juxtaposed photographs? Why do you think you make that choice?

2) If you think you will draw yourself (by hand or using a computer), how did you represent what you look like? Will you try to draw something that looks like you or will you draw a more cartoon-like figure? Is the choice you made based on how you want to represent yourself? Or, was it for practical reasons related to doing the drawing? Explain your choices.

3) If you plan to photos of yourself – will you use photos from different time periods (for example, one current photo and one childhood photo) or will you use current photos but taken in different locations/contexts? Why did you make that choice? What are you trying to convey by using the photos in this way?

4) Do you think it will be easy or difficult to write about different aspects of your identity?

5) What will be the tone of your descriptive statements? Will you use humor and sarcasm like Alexie? Will you use a more sincere or serious tone? Why do you think have you made that choice and how do you think it will enhance your writing?

6) Do you think Alexie’s use of illustrations throughout the book enhance the story or distract from it? How?

7) Would you have preferred just to write a narrative about your identity and experiences, or do you like using visual elements to tell your story? Why?

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer address all the questions asked in the prompt?

Content
– Did the writer provide specific examples to support their ideas about the work they have done or will do creating a visual and descriptive piece to accompany their narrative on Alexie’s book?

General objective: Critical Analysis + Visual Storytelling

This assignment will allow students to work with a key trope within Sherman Alexie’s Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian – the idea of someone forming a split or conflicted identity by living, working, and having relationships/responsibilities within two different contexts. These contexts can be due to geography, age, familial responsibilities, culture, region, socioeconomics, language, race/ethnicity, or even personal interests and beliefs.

The goal of the assignment is to draw from the analytical skills gained through previous assignments in order to create an original visual and written character study of the writer similar to the “Half Indian/Half White” illustration and description Alexie used to reflect on his main character’s identity. This assignment requires the writer to use a critical, reflective lens to analyze one’s own identity and sense of belonging in multiple social contexts.

Word Count and Title:

– 400-500 words
– An illustration or juxtaposed photographs
– An original title that reflects the content of the blog post and the writer’s perspective/style

In-text links:

None required.

Reference list:
Sherman Alexie’s Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian in MLA style.

Key writing components:

1) Provide a hand or computer drawn illustration, or juxtaposed photographs of the writer showing a difference or conflict in identity.
2) Write at least 7-10 key descriptions of the character, which show the different ways the character looks, acts, and/or feels in the two different contexts presented.
3) Below the illustration/photo, write a critical, reflective narrative explaining the two contexts and the significance of how the writer’s identity changes from one context to another.
4) Use one paragraph to reflect on Alexie’s use of the “Half Indian/Half White” illustration and his description of Junior’s conflicted sense of identity, and how it inspired or influenced how you represented yourself. Use details to show your perspectives.

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer complete the writing assignment fully, following directions on length, reference, visual image and number of written descriptions?
– Did the writer edit/revise the grammar, style, and content of the illustration/photo(s) and descriptions in order to produce a refined final product?

Content
– Did the writer describe and interpret the two identities presented in detail, using clear, relevant character traits to show key differences and contradictions between the two identities?
– Did the writer exhibit (photographs) or produce an original work (illustration) that draws inspiration from Alexie’s book and demonstrates the writer’s own perspective on individual identity and community context?
– Did the writer’s narrative reflect on 1) Alexie’s use of the “Half Indian/Half White” illustration, 2) their own experience of different identities in different contexts, and 3) the process of linking their experience to Alexie’s main character through this writing assignment?

General objective: Reflecting on interviewing

In this post about your writing process, you will write a narrative that addresses the below list of questions about your experience asking someone you know to participate in an interview with you, creating an interview protocol that asks the respondent to tell stories about their community identity, an converting the raw data of the interview into a blog post.

Word Count:
250-300 words

Questions to answer through your narrative:

1) How did you choose the person you wanted to interview? Was it difficult to ask for participation? How did you explain to the respondent what you were going to interview them about and why you were interviewing them?

2) How did the respondent feel about the interview being published on your blog and possibly read by other people? Did they choose to have their real name used or did they prefer that you use a pseudonym?

3) When you were trying to create a 10-question interview protocol, what are some choices you made about the language of each question in order to create an interview protocol that solicits the kinds of stories you wanted the respondent to tell?

4) Will you interview the respondent in person or over the phone? Why did you make this decision? Do you anticipate any pros and/or cons related to your method of interviewing?

5) Will you record the interview or will you take detailed notes of the interview? Why did you make that choice? Do you anticipate any pros and/or cons related to your method of capturing the data?

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer address all the questions asked in the prompt?

Content
– Did the writer describe their thoughts on the questions asked using clear, detailed language?

– Did the writer provide specific examples from their writing experience as evidence to support their ideas about interviewing a person and trying to tell a particular type of story through the interview?

General objective: Interviewing + Community Storytelling

This is the main assignment for the second unit of the course, which focuses on community stories. It demonstrates an understanding of community identity formation – that ways in which people create a collective sense of identity and maintain that sense of identity through the passing on of community histories and memories. It will also allow the writer to explore another dimension of critical analysis, which involves interpreting the stories of real people in specific time and place contexts.

The development and implementation of an interview protocol will allow students to learn basic skills in qualitative research and community storytelling. This is a multiple part assignment and will require the writer to:

1) Choose a respondent and ask them to participate in the interview,
2) Write and edit the interview protocol,
3) Conduct and record the interview (through notes or digital recording),
4) Interpret the interview content and choose how to present the interview and the writer’s interpretations in the final blog post.

Word Count and Title:

– 700-800 words
– An original title that reflects the content of the blog post and the writer’s perspective/style

In-text links:

None required unless the interviewee refers to an event, history, or facts that requires providing the reader with more information from an outside source.

Reference list:

A reference entry for the interview itself. And references for any outside sources used to provide context for the stories told in the interview, in MLA style.

Interview Prompt:

Interview a person you know well (friend, family member, roommate, community leader) about what they think “community” means; and the people that they consider to be their main “community.”

Write questions that will ask the respondent to talk about what they know of the history of their community – the stories often told that have stuck with them over time, or that everyone in the community seems to know or tell. What are some experiences that people from this community seem to share? What are the aspects of this community’s culture that makes it unique? In what ways is it similar to other communities? Also, are there things about their community that they wish other people knew?

The respondent can be someone who shares the writer’s community background, or someone from a different background than the writer. The final written assignment will integrate the respondent’s perspective and the writer’s perspective on community storytelling, shared experiences, and different ways that people communicate community histories to people outside of the community.

Key writing components:

1) The interview protocol – either the exact questions used or paraphrased statements that let the reader know what questions were asked.
2) Provide an introduction (1 paragraph) that gives the reader a clear sense of who the respondent was, the main topics of the interview.
3) An organized interview that includes both the writer and respondent’s voices/perspectives.
4) A conclusion (1 paragraph) that summarizes and interprets the perspectives presented in the interview regarding the main theme of “community.”

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer complete the writing assignment fully, following directions on length, interview protocol, and blog post organization and content?
– Did the writer edit/revise the grammar, style, and content of the essay in order to produce a refined final product?

Content
– Did the writer describe the interview respondent, the purpose/goal of the interview, and interpretations of the interview content in a clear and detailed manner?
– Did the writer provide sound and relevant interpretations of the interview content, using the direct quotes from the respondent as evidence for the any interpretations or arguments developed through the interview?
– Did the writer reflect on the experience of interviewing someone the broader role of interviewing storytelling in forming a community’s sense of identity and history?

General objective: Reflecting on group work and studying historical objects

In this post about your writing process, you will write a narrative that addresses the below list of questions about your experience working in a group to study, analyze, and write about a historical object from the MARBL archive.

Word Count:
250-300 words

Questions to answer through your narrative:
1) What was the object your group worked with? Was it the type of object you would think naturally belongs in an archive or was it unusual in any way? What were some of the thoughts you had as you were first studying during the MARBL workshop?

2) How did the group members divide up the analysis of the object? Who focused on what aspect of the object? And why did you choose that particular angle of analysis (why did you think it was important or interesting)?

3) What questions did you ask MARBL Librarian Gabrielle Dudley about your object? Do you end up contacting Gabrielle again or meeting with her to ask follow up questions and seek assistance on your group’s narrative?

4) By this point in the semester, you have analyzed a lot of different genres of texts – visual art, poetry, novels, short stories, songs, television shows, websites, etc. Was analyzing a historical object easier or harder than those other texts? Why?

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer address all the questions asked in the prompt?

Content
– Did the writer describe their thoughts on the questions asked using clear, detailed language?
– Did the writer provide specific examples from their writing experience as evidence to support their ideas about the work they did working in a group to study and write about a historical object from the MARBL archive?

General objective: Object Analysis + Historical Storytelling

This is one of two writing assignments for the third unit of the course, which focuses on storytelling as social action. This written interpretation of a historical object demonstrates an understanding of how the historical context and political purpose of an object affects its construction, use, interpretation, and significance for contemporary society. The object as an archived “piece” of history also provokes conversations about ownership and historical preservation of some stories and the loss of others.

Interpreting and writing about the object as a group allows writers to create a larger and more in-depth analysis of the object from multiple angles and perspectives. Linking the group members’ interpretations together through in-text links and comments demonstrates an understanding of group discourse and the effective use of web-based writing to conduct this discourse in an organized and creative way.

Word Count and Title:

– 500-600 words per group member
– A photo of the object by each group member
– An original title that reflects the content of the blog post and the writer’s perspective/style

In-text links:

Link to each of the group members’ posts once (1 link per group member). Provide at least three (3) additional relevant in-text hyperlinks that direct the reader to a news, art, popular media, or academic source which helps illustrate the writer’s interpretation of the archived object.

Reference list:

A reference entry for the archived object. Reference entries for group members’ blog posts. And, references for any other outside sources used to provide information, histories, and context for the object, in MLA style.

Key writing components:

1) A photo and detailed description of the object and its origin.
2) A critical analysis of the object from one (1) focused position: social and political context at time of creation; use of the object during its time; person who created the object and/or person who owned the object; the significance of the object to contemporary society.
3) Comments (40-50 words) on all other group members’ posts. Each group member will write about the same object using a different focus, then link to and comment on each other’s blog posts to help create a fuller story for the reader.

Grading criteria:

Structure
– Did the writer complete the writing assignment fully, following directions on length, focused content, in-text links, and commenting?
– Did the writer edit/revise the grammar, style, and content of the essay in order to produce a refined final product?

Content
– Did the writer describe the object in a clear and detailed manner?
– Did the writer provide sound and relevant interpretations of the object, using a focused approach from one analytical angle? Are the writer’s interpretations and descriptions consistent with those of other group members?
– Did the writer reflect on the broader role of archived objects in telling the stories of major historical events and social movements?

General Objective of Blog Post Comments:

The blog post comment is a short response to the content and writing style/structure of another student’s blog post. All the commenting assignments will be done in groups with individuals who have already peer-reviewed each other’s writing or collaborated on a writing project together. The goal of comments in online writing is to create dialogue about the writer’s work and ideas.

In Comments Assignment #2, students will comment on Blog Post #5 of of their MARBL workshop and Blog Post #5 group members. The group members will have decided on the various analytical perspectives of the blog posts together and will already have read earlier drafts of each other’s work. Their comments should be based in part on this previous knowledge.

Word Count:
40-60 words

Key Components and Grading Criteria:

1) All commenters should identify themselves by their first and last names in the comment in order to receive credit for having commented.

2) Comments should be written in a way that directly addresses the writer.

3) Comments should focus on one or two key points that the commenter thinks stand out within the blog post.

4) Comments should be substantive and specific. They should not be general or vague. Commenters should use direct quotes or paraphrasing from the blog post if needed. They can speak to the content of the blog post or the writer’s style of writing. They can provide praise, constructive criticism, or ask questions.

This is a peer-to-peer teaching method where a group of students become the teachers for the day. The objective is for the teaching team to study the assigned topic in greater depth and provide information and opinions about that topic that we might not have already learned in class.

The teaching team will become very familiar with the topic and conduct outside-of-class research so that they can create: 1) a maximum 10-minute PowerPoint or Prezi presentation on the assigned subject, and 2) a 45-50 minute class activity and/or discussion that teaches their fellow students key concepts from the assigned texts for that day.

  • Your PowerPoint or Prezi presentation will present new information/material related to the topic of the texts, and also connect the information presented to the themes of the course (look back at the third bullet point under the “Course Description” tab on the Course Information page of our website.
  • To teach the topic to your classmates, you should have a clear understanding of what you think are the key aspects of the texts that would be important for everyone in the class to know well.
  • From your perspective, what purpose do the texts serve in bringing forward narratives about identity, community, and power?
  • Critical analysis: After understanding the basics, you should bring your own interpretations to the table – your thoughts, feelings, and/or critiques of the texts and use them to pose substantive questions and ideas to your classmates. Do not just summarize the information you find through research. Add your own perspective.
  • Come up with an activity for your classmates to do as a class or as smaller groups, or facilitate a discussion among all the students.
  • Create a one-page handout that your classmates can take with them, which summarizes everything you think they should know by the end of your presentation and discussion/activity. Please email me the handout ahead of time so that I can print it for the whole class.

Grading Rubric:

Your group will be graded on the following components:

  • Quality of the presentation
  • Participation of all group members
  • Abiding by the time allotted to the presentation (max 10 minutes)
  • Full use of time for class discussion/activity (45-50 minutes)
  • Clear understanding of the basic themes and concepts related to the assigned texts
  • Application of critical analysis, the group’s own interpretations of the assigned texts
  • The creativity and interactive aspects of the class activity or discussion

FINAL REFLECTIVE ESSAY & WRITING PORTFOLIO

Please read the rubric below carefully and with an eye to its details. This is your map for completing the final assignment.

I will grade your final writing assignment and portfolio using this rubric as my guide.

 

Final Reflective Essay – 900-1000 words total:

 

Explanation of assignment

The reflective essay is an in-depth analysis of your own writing over the course of the semester. It will function as “writer’s statement” that introduces your final portfolio. In other fields of study, this could be called an Executive Summary (business) or Abstract (natural science; social science).

In this case, rather than summarizing and analyzing a research study or business proposal, you are summarizing and analyzing the progression of your own writing approach and process over the course of the 4 final blog posts you chose for the Final Portfolio. That is why this essay is called a “reflective” essay. Its purpose is to have you reflect upon yourself in the context of your first college-level writing course. It should explore the improvements or progression you have made in your writing. And challenges you will continue to work on in the Continuing Writing course(s) you will take in the future.

 

Key components of the essay

The “source” for evidence to back up the things you write about in the final reflective essay will be your Process Posts and Blog Posts, as well as your own thoughts about the writing process this semester. When referring to your PPs or BPs, be specific, even use quotes from your own writing as needed. Treat your PPs and BPs like you would a published work that you are using to support an argument or perspective.

To make the essay easier to organize, I have divided the prompt into into 3 main sections. Your Final Reflective Essay should also generally be organized into 3 main sections divided by section titles. But do not use the same titles that I used. Your section titles should reflect your own ideas about the main theme or argument of that section.

 

REFLECTING ON YOURSELF AS A STUDENT IN A FIRST YEAR WRITING COURSE:

  • Prior to coming to college, what were the main forms of analysis and writing you had done? And, was there a process you had already established for completing writing assignments (outlining, drafting, editing, having friends/family read your work and give feedback, getting feedback from instructor…)
  • Has your process for writing changed over the course of the semester in a First Year Writing class? Have you learned ways of writing that you had not done before – whether topics, content, genre, audience, visual v. text, online publishing, etc.?
  • What insights have you gained into yourself as a student in a college-level writing class? For example, in what areas do you excel? What do you find challenging? How did your strengths and challenges affect the writing you did over the course of the semester?
  • Are there new strategies you now employ to choose a topic, draft an essay, complete the final writing piece that you had not done previously? Why did you make these changes to your writing process? Did you find your work improved when you organized or wrote your essays using a particular process?

 

REFLECTING ON THE CONTENT AND FORM OF WRITING IN A FIRST YEAR WRITING COURSE:

After having completed a number of different types of assignments this semester, what have you learned about yourself as a student who:

  • Created an original narrative and/or visual based on personal experiences or interests?
  • Analyzed a variety of texts written by other authors from different time periods?
  • Analyzed visual arts (paintings, videos, illustrated novels, television)?
  • Interviewed another person and crafted that conversation into final written interview?
  • Collaborated with others on both writing and presentation/teaching project?
  • Used visual components (both those created by you and those curated from the web) to supplement your written text?
  • Did the fact that you not only completed writing assignments, but did so within an online platform (the blog), affect how you 1) thought about, 2) researched, 3) analyzed, 4) cited, 5) wrote, and/or 6) edited your writing assignments? Explain why or why not using examples from your own writing.

 

REFLECTING ON THE WRITING ITSELF:

  • What was the absolute best thing you wrote for this course (by your own assessment)?
  • Was it also your favorite thing to write this semester (i.e. did you enjoy writing it the most)? Or was it something you struggled with but ended up turning out very well? Explain and use direct examples from the your blog post.
  • Why do you think this your best work?
  • As you read through your 4 best blog posts in order to revise and edit them, what did you think were a few key strengths in your writing that were reflected in all of those blog posts?
  • As you read through your 4 best blog posts in order to revise and edit them, what did you think was something you were challenged by or struggled with, which was apparent in all of those blog posts?
  • If your answer to this question is “grammar,” think through in detail about the specific kinds of grammar errors you tend to make. Have you come up with any strategies to address these in the future? Did you find that the number of errors was lower in later writing assignments than in the beginning of the semester or did they tend to stay the same? Do you remember doing anything during your writing process to address grammar challenges?

 

*******************

Final Writing Portfolio – revise, refine, and edit your 4 best blog posts. As you think through how to do so, read the questions below. They will help you make decisions about your revision:

 

Decide what aspects of the piece you need/want to revise:

  • First, read through each piece you have chosen. Look at it with fresh eyes, and make a clear, effective plan for revising the work in order to improve it. Look back at the original writing rubric to remember what was the original intention/criteria for the blog post.
  • Look back at the feedback I gave you on each piece. Did I suggest any specific changes? Did you get points off for a particular aspect of the essay?
  • Did you feel when you posted the piece that you would have liked to add/subtract/change something about it if you had more the time?

 

Is grammar something you need to work on in the revision?

  • When trying to work on grammar, go to an ESL tutor. Or, work in pairs or groups with friends in the class or outside of it to read each other’s pieces. Working with other students or with a tutor is much better than relying on spell-check or grammar check software. The goal is not just to correct grammar errors, but also to make your piece flow better and be organized in a way that maximizes the reader’s understanding of what you are trying to convey.

 

Add visual elements and hyperlinks if you did not do that in the original post:

  • If your original post was more focused on the writing, spend some time in the final revision adding relevant visual elements to your 4 chosen posts that will enhance the themes/arguments/ideas presented in the essay.
  • Also, if your original post had no hyperlinks in it, see if a couple of links to relevant sources, sites, articles with more information might enhance the blog post. Only use hyperlinks that lead to legitimate, vetted sources that provide information or perspectives that will add to/support what you have presented in your essay.
  • In general, remember that publishing work in an online format is different from a written paper. Try to have your blog posts look like blog posts. Visual elements are part of that. Making sure the spacing, size, and font of the text itself is another part. Make these changes to the post one at a time and keep checking it online to see how your changes look in the browser. This will help you control things in case something you try does not look as you expected.

*******************

How to turn in your Final Reflective Essay and Writing Portfolio in the correct way and on time:

  • On your “POSTS” Page where all your Blog Posts and Process Posts can be viewed – simply have your Final Reflective Essay and your 4 revised blog posts be the top most 5 blog posts on that page. Title them accordingly so that I know what they are: title the final reflective essay “Final Reflective Essay” and name each of the blog posts by its original BP# and title, then write “Revised” or “2.0” or “Final”, or anything else to indicate it is the new, revised version one.
  • Also, email me the 5 items as one PDF file – i.e. copy and paste all the pieces into a Microsoft Word document, and save as a PDF that you email to me. Email me just the writing with hyperlinks and citations. Exclude any visual elements.
  • Please make a note of your due date – also shown on each class’ course website: ENG101-00P MW 11:30 — Final due by 3pm on Friday, December 11th
    • I can provide each student in ENG101-00P with feedback 1 time on a draft of the final reflective essay and revised blog posts. If you want feedback on a draft, email it to me at smukhta@emory.edu at the very latest by the end of the day on Monday December 7th. I will not be providing feedback after this date.